TiteGroup loads

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  • Last Post 22 April 2016
45ACPete posted this 18 April 2016

My first experience with this powder as I'm kind of hoarding my supply of Bullseye until it becomes more available.  Loaded fifty .32 Longs with MagTech HBWC's and 2g TiteGroup and, at the range loaded five in my Colt Officer's Model Heavy Barrel.  The very first round sounded like a fairly hot .38 load and much greater recoil than I ever experienced with 2g Bullseye loads. The cylinder was jammed so tight I couldn't budge it.  My local gunsmith got it open (strong fingers)--I guess the blown out primer fell out on the shop floor--we didn't notice.  The gun is fine.  Back home I pulled the bullets from three rounds--powder in all three measured 2g.  So--a double charge?   I use the same loading procedure with all pistol rounds that are loaded single stage.  Primed, expanded cases are in a loading block and charged with a Little Dandy measure.  Before seating bullets I look into every case with a flashlight.  An empty case is easily detected--but quite possibly a double charged case got by me.  The thing is, these rounds were loose in a plastic bag--the odds that the first round fired was an overload was one in fifty. I'm reluctant to fire any more--probably ought to pull some more, like maybe all the rest?  Opinions?

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Brodie posted this 18 April 2016

45ACP Pete; I don't know what charge of BE is appropriate in the .32LOng , but may I suggest a method for eliminating double charges period.  Size, bell and prime your case. Charge case and immediately seat the bullet. I have been loading in this manner for fifty years and have never had a double charge.  I got started this way because I couldn't get a loading block when I first started loading.  The only times I have used a loading block are when I have prepared cases for fire forming and needed to charge with powder and then COW and a wad.

If the gun smith says you are good to go I'd pull the charges from the rest of the loads and proceed as normal. Brodie

B.E.Brickey

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Ken Campbell Iowa posted this 18 April 2016

here is what i would do:

since you have a strong revolver, i would make sure i had 2 gr. load, then put on a leather glove and safety glasses and shoot it ... curiosity and the cat thing ...

but since it probably really was a double charge, you will still have to dismantle all those loads ...

i use a little dandy also...never a double charge ... but i can see how it could easily happen ... i do make a dipstick and check every case tho ...

ken

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M3 Mitch posted this 18 April 2016

Old Coot wrote: 45ACP Pete; I don't know what charge of BE is appropriate in the .32LOng , but may I suggest a method for eliminating double charges period.  Size, bell and prime your case. Charge case and immediately seat the bullet. I have been loading in this manner for fifty years and have never had a double charge.  I got started this way because I couldn't get a loading block when I first started loading.  The only times I have used a loading block are when I have prepared cases for fire forming and needed to charge with powder and then COW and a wad.

If the gun smith says you are good to go I'd pull the charges from the rest of the loads and proceed as normal. Brodie

FWIW, I do the same thing.  I don't even own a loading block, and have been loading one way or another since 1980.  Mostly I use turret or progressive presses, and I'm pretty obsessive about cycling the powder measure and then plug the open brass with a bullet.

So far, so good, never had a powderless or double load. 

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John Alexander posted this 18 April 2016

Before i pulled the others I would weigh the loaded rounds.  If you have an electronic scale it doesn't take long.  Unless the brass is mixed lots you should be able to spot a double charge easily.  If none I would put off shooting the rest until i worked up slowly toward 2 grains unless you have already been shooting the 2 grain loads and know they are OK. John

 

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Brodie posted this 18 April 2016

My apologies Pete, I did not read your post thoroughly the first time.  You are loading with 2 gr. of Tight Group powder not Bullseye.  I would do like John suggested and weigh the loaded rounds first,  but I would pull them anyway.  As you say it must have been a double charge.  According to the Hodgdon site 2gr of Titegroup only develops 10900 psi with a 93gr HBWC .  Not enough to cause the symptoms you have described.  I would pull them and review my reloading practices.

B.E.Brickey

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45ACPete posted this 19 April 2016

I appreciate all the advice offered. Was really hoping to hear from someone who has had experience with TiteGroup. In a strong revolver even a double charge of 4g ought not to blow out a primer, I think.

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M3 Mitch posted this 19 April 2016

Hodgdon's online manual lists a starting load of 2 grains and a max load of 2.3 grains of Titegroup for a 90 grain bullet in the 32 S&W Long (I don't see where you stated bullet weight in OP - if I missed it, sorry). The max pressure is 10,000 psi, and I agree that an Officer's Model Heavy Barrel should be good for way higher, should be good to 40K at least. I have one of these and it is the same frame as a Python. I looked at 327 Federal Magnum loads, case volume is not much different, they list max of 5.7g of Titegroup for 39,600 psi. So I think you are right, 4 grains should not have blown a primer in your gat. With the heaviest bullet listed, 115g, 4.6g of Titegroup is max with 40,600 psi.

This leaves at least me wondering: “OK, then, what DID happen?"

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Pigslayer posted this 20 April 2016

Careful. I'm using 4.2 grs. Titegroup behind a 255gr. SWC in my .44 Special. Nice moderate load & about the same performance as 6 grs. Unique. But in a .357? Hmmmmmmmmm. I need to look up some specs on that.

If someone else had of done to me what I did to myself . . . I'd have killed him. Humility is an asset. Heh - heh.

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gpidaho posted this 20 April 2016

As TiteGroup is my favorite all around powder I'll chip in my two cents worth. I'm not much help to the OP as I've fired very few rounds out of 32 cal. S&Ws. TiteGroup, like all fast powders needs to be worked up in small increments as it can easily be overloaded. On to Pat's comments, I use TiteGroup in both 38spl and 357mag to very good result, also 41 mag. Work these up in YOUR gun but 5gr under 125gr bullet in 357 or 7gr. in 41mag 210gr. are favorites of mine. Gp

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45ACPete posted this 20 April 2016

Thanks, guys--will be weighing cartridges and pulling bullets from any that are suspect before shooting any more from that lot.

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M3 Mitch posted this 20 April 2016

M3 Mitch wrote: Hodgdon's online manual lists a starting load of 2 grains and a max load of 2.3 grains of Titegroup for a 90 grain bullet in the 32 S&W Long (I don't see where you stated bullet weight in OP - if I missed it, sorry). The max pressure is 10,000 psi, and I agree that an Officer's Model Heavy Barrel should be good for way higher, should be good to 40K at least. I have one of these and it is the same frame as a Python. I looked at 327 Federal Magnum loads, case volume is not much different, they list max of 5.7g of Titegroup for 39,600 psi. So I think you are right, 4 grains should not have blown a primer in your gat. With the heaviest bullet listed, 115g, 4.6g of Titegroup is max with 40,600 psi.

This leaves at least me wondering: “OK, then, what DID happen?" Gents, my post above probably not the best presentation of information, since I did say “Python” (most of them are .357Mag) and 327 Federal Mag in almost the same breath here.  The loading data that I looked at online is for the 327 Federal Magnum, which, if I am not mistaken, is related to the .32 S&W about the same as the 357 Mag is to the 38 Special. 

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Dale53 posted this 21 April 2016

I would suggest that weighing loaded rounds for a .32 S&W Long cartridge and expecting good results can lead to serious problems. Empty cases will often vary more than your powder charge (especially if more than one brand of case is used).

If I had any suspect rounds (as that whole batch should be after your experience), I would pull each and every one of them. Don't take a chance on hurting yourself (or others) OR that fine revolver. It's not worth it.

Let's stay safe, folks!

If you were loading a cartridge with much heavier charges weighing loaded rounds CAN be helpful but not when the charge is 2.0 grs.

Just a thought or two...

Dale53

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Ed Harris posted this 21 April 2016

I agree with Dale53, either pull them or borrow a Ruger to shoot them.

73 de KE4SKY In Home Mix We Trust From the Home of Ed's Red in "Almost Heaven" West Virginia

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Ken Campbell Iowa posted this 21 April 2016

i suppose i should mention that if all loads are double charges.......they would all weigh the same ...

also, maybe the wrong rotor ?

i have “adjusted ” my lil dandy rotors by filling the cavities with wax ....just to add to the list of What Could Go Wrong ...

ken

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R. Dupraz posted this 22 April 2016

I'm with Dale53,absolutely! Read his reply again and pull every last one.

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