Ruger Alaskan 454 Loads

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  • Last Post 22 March 2016
.452dia posted this 21 March 2016

I'm trying to find a suitable powder to push my 335 gn lead gc bullets with. My H110 loads are not getting me what I want with this bullet. I see where some say WW-296 works better then others say Lil Gun or True Blue Enforcer work better. I realize there is a trade-off when shooting these large calibers in short barrels but I would like to hear from some of those who have hands on experience with loading for the Alaskan in this caliber.

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Ken Campbell Iowa posted this 21 March 2016

h110 is my favorite powder for hot loads in my 44 mag and 357 mag ...

do you have any chronographed baseline velocities with your gun ? and how do factory loads chronograph in your gun ?

i don't have a 454, so above is just as an interested onlooker .

ken

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.452dia posted this 21 March 2016

Not at the moment, I have new screens ordered.  I haven't used any factory ammo with heavy bullets.  Once I get a load that performs with these bullets I may start trying others if can I find the moulds for these wide metplate heavy bullets.

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onondaga posted this 21 March 2016

http://www.castbulletassoc.org/view_user.php?id=5395>.452dia

Link to Hodgdon burn rate chart:

https://www.hodgdon.com/PDF/Burn%20Rates%20-%202015-2016.pdf>https://www.hodgdon.com/PDF/Burn%20Rates%20-%202015-2016.pdf

H110 is number 63 on the chart, that means there are 62 powders on the list faster than H110.

That should be meaningful to you if you believe in matching burn rate to barrel length. Selecting a faster powder with a better case fill than H110 should work if you stay within safe pressure. Quickload will figure this out for you without firing a shot.

There are some Quickload wizards on this site that will help if you ask and give them the info they need to run the problem.

Gary

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.452dia posted this 22 March 2016

onondaga wrote: http://www.castbulletassoc.org/view_user.php?id=5395>.452dia

Link to Hodgdon burn rate chart:

https://www.hodgdon.com/PDF/Burn%20Rates%20-%202015-2016.pdf>https://www.hodgdon.com/PDF/Burn%20Rates%20-%202015-2016.pdf

H110 is number 63 on the chart, that means there are 62 powders on the list faster than H110.

That should be meaningful to you if you believe in matching burn rate to barrel length. Selecting a faster powder with a better case fill than H110 should work if you stay within safe pressure. Quickload will figure this out for you without firing a shot.

There are some Quickload wizards on this site that will help if you ask and give them the info they need to run the problem.

Gary Thanks Gary,   I realize that H110 is a relatively slow handgun powder and of the 63 faster powders how many can be used for the application I described.  A powder that is too fast creates too much pressure before achieving the desired velocity.  Somewhere in there is a powder that will achieve the results I'm looking for.

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Ken Campbell Iowa posted this 22 March 2016

there have been a few tests done on barrel length versus powder burn rate .

as i remember ... because i believe everything i hear or read ... the results indicated that the best powder might be more to do with expansion ratio than barrel length .

i believe a google research is in order ...

or heck maybe ed harris might have been there done that ... ( g ) ...

ken

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Brodie posted this 22 March 2016

.452dia, Here is the link to Hodgon's load site: ww.hodgdonreloading.com/data/pistol.  As close as I can tell all the data is for jacketed bullets, but you can use the same data for cast with a great degree of confidence as the same or similar weight cast bullet won't develop as high a pressure as a jacketed bullet with the same load.  Unfortunately this means that the velocity will also be lower.  If you don't own one or have access to a chronograph I would get access to one.  It not only tells you how fast the bullet is going, but will also indicate pressure of a given load.  There is a direct relationship between pressure and velocity.  The higher the pressure the faster until the gun comes apart.  It is a valuable tool to have.  

Just what speed are you trying to drive this 385gr. bullet?  I would think that a 1000fps would be plenty to drive such a slug from the north end and out the south of anything that walks this continent.  Remember: ” What you shoot doesn't make as much difference as where you hit them.". Brodie

B.E.Brickey

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.452dia posted this 22 March 2016

Thanks for the info but it lists loads tested in a Freedom Arms 9.3+ inch barrel which will not be the same in the shorter 2.5 inch tube.  I realize that I can shoot a big heavy bullet at 900 fps and take about anything in the continental US but that takes the fun out of experimenting with different components to get the best out of gun/caliber combination.  I currently working with 325 gn wide nose, gas check bullets from Cast Performance.  I've used these bullets in my 45 Colt loads for my Vaquero with great results on Whitetail.  I bought the Alaskan for protection from critters with claws and tusks and I realize the 45 Colt will work just fine with these critters too but the Alaskan is chambered for 454 so why not use the extra power?  Besides, I love to experiment.

Old Coot wrote: .452dia, Here is the link to Hodgon's load site: ww.hodgdonreloading.com/data/pistol.  As close as I can tell all the data is for jacketed bullets, but you can use the same data for cast with a great degree of confidence as the same or similar weight cast bullet won't develop as high a pressure as a jacketed bullet with the same load.  Unfortunately this means that the velocity will also be lower.  If you don't own one or have access to a chronograph I would get access to one.  It not only tells you how fast the bullet is going, but will also indicate pressure of a given load.  There is a direct relationship between pressure and velocity.  The higher the pressure the faster until the gun comes apart.  It is a valuable tool to have.  

Just what speed are you trying to drive this 385gr. bullet?  I would think that a 1000fps would be plenty to drive such a slug from the north end and out the south of anything that walks this continent.  Remember: ” What you shoot doesn't make as much difference as where you hit them.". Brodie

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