match bullets out of a multiple cavity mould

  • 2K Views
  • Last Post 03 December 2009
billwnr posted this 27 November 2009

How many of you use 2 or 4 cavity moulds to cast your match bullets? I use both a 311679 (2 cavity) and an NEI 72A. I don't care which cavity the bullets come from as they are about equal in diameter and weight.

I do weigh mine which is the equivalent of sorting by cavity.

Attached Files

Order By: Standard | Newest | Votes
tturner53 posted this 27 November 2009

I have a new Saeco #315 DC that I've used in postal matches. It is turning out to be a pretty good all purpose bullet.

Attached Files

RicinYakima posted this 27 November 2009

Bill,

I use both, 1 and 2 cavity. The Lyman '679 I have also has the cavities so close, I'm just weight sorting also. But, my four cavity WC 38 mould has increasing size and weight from front to back holes. Guess it just depends on the mould.

Ric

Attached Files

LWesthoff posted this 27 November 2009

I have three each two-cavity Lyman molds which I use for casting match bullets. The cavities on all three are marked so I can segregate by cavity, which task I combine with visual inspection for flaws/irregularities. I then select by weight, and I do not mix bullets from two different cavities on a single target. I'm not absolutely certain all this is necessary, but guys like Frank Marshall say it helps, and I'm willing to take their advice. I figure I need all the help I can get.

Attached Files

billwnr posted this 27 November 2009

You shoot pretty good Wes, so marking your cavities works for you.

My bullets are round so I only sort by weight. I have had other moulds with oval cavities.

Attached Files

Johnny Breedlove posted this 01 December 2009

I cast with a RCBS 180 Sil. 30 cal. Double cav. and sort by weight and bullet condition only. There is very little difference in diameter, maybe 1 or 2 .000 but if there was I really don't think a few thousands difference will make any difference as long as they weigh + or - within 1/2 gr. or less. The sizing die will take care of the rest. Out of 500 cast I only get about 10% culls. That is as long as my melt is working OK. That can very quit a bit sometimes. Even if I had to through back half of them I would still be satisfied.

Attached Files

billwnr posted this 01 December 2009

The sizing die only takes care of the base portion. The nose stays relatively untouched and unless bore diameter or over, will stay out of round.

Attached Files

Paul Pollard posted this 02 December 2009

I did a test with an LBT 258-120SP, while shooting a .25BR.

The cavities are unmarked. The bullets were inspected and weighed, and I wrote down the weights. The weights were entered in a statistics program called MiniTab.

In the strictest statistical sense, the program showed the bullets were from one population. When the program graphed the information, there were two bell curves which overlapped.

In a match, I managed to make it look like these bullets came from several different moulds of various designs and weights.

Attached Files

CB posted this 02 December 2009

Paul Pollard wrote: I did a test with an LBT 258-120SP, while shooting a .25BR.

The cavities are unmarked. The bullets were inspected and weighed, and I wrote down the weights. The weights were entered in a statistics program called MiniTab.

In the strictest statistical sense, the program showed the bullets were from one population. When the program graphed the information, there were two bell curves which overlapped.

In a match, I managed to make it look like these bullets came from several different moulds of various designs and weights. :D

Attached Files

billwnr posted this 02 December 2009

I used to end up with the double humped bell curve with my first rifle but had enough other problems with it that statistically I couldn't claim anything.

With the new rifle and probably many humps in the bell curve as I cast a year's worth of bullets up over the course of a month I don't see any problems. Still working out the kinks with the rifle but have seen groups as small as .303".

Attached Files

Johnny Breedlove posted this 03 December 2009

billwnr: The nose of the bullet is not the steering end of the bullet, the base of the bullet is. You can actually damage the nose of the bullet and it will still shoot in the group. You can prove this to your self. Get some factory loaded rifle bullets and shoot a group with some spire point soft point bullets then bend the soft nose portion of one bullet and shoot it in the same group. You will find that it will shoot point of aim with the rest of the group. No argument intended.

Attached Files

billwnr posted this 03 December 2009

Johnny, The nose of the bullet might not “steer” the bullet while it's in the barrel, but once it's flying thru the air an out of round bullet should fly funny. Sorta like a tire that's not balanced.

Just my thoughts.

Attached Files

Johnny Breedlove posted this 03 December 2009

billwnr: your probably right. Although, I read an artical in one of my magazines of a test someone did and came to the conclusion that bullets with damaged noses did not have an effect on at least hunting accuracy. I can't find the artical or I already got rid of the mag. With out some hands on testing I won't come to any conclusions either. I don't know if any of my moulds produce out of round noses or not. I'm not sure how that could be checked other than visual inspection. I would not shoot any that were obviously out of round though. I won't even shoot those with bad rinkles, it's too easy just to remelt and cast new ones.

JB

Attached Files

billwnr posted this 03 December 2009

Someone did an article in Guns and Ammo back in the 80's on the topic of damaged noses and what type of damage it took (and where) to make the bullets deviate from the group.

Attached Files

Close