Turret Press

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Pigslayer posted this 22 November 2012

Looking to buy a Turret press. Don't need it in the progressive style. Thinking about one of the older Lymans or even the Lyman Truline with it being converted to accept 7/8"-14 dies. Any suggestions?

If someone else had of done to me what I did to myself . . . I'd have killed him. Humility is an asset. Heh - heh.

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onondaga posted this 22 November 2012

Pat, the Lee Turret and the Lee Classic Cast Turret with floating die holding disks get the best concentricity  of loaded ammo. I prefer the Classic Cast because the newer Safety Prime setup available for it  is better for me.

https://fsreloading.com/lee-classic-turret-press-90064.html>https://fsreloading.com/lee-classic-turret-press-90064.html      press, out of stock today but due in 2 weeks......$94.95 a steal!

https://fsreloading.com/lee-tp-safety-prime-upkit-90042.html>https://fsreloading.com/lee-tp-safety-prime-upkit-90042.html      safety prime

Shop dealer prices, but, I don't think you will beat FS !!!

The less expensive updated 4 hole Precision Turret Press will also work with the SafetyPrime but older than 2007 or used older ones wont. :

https://fsreloading.com/lee-4-hole-turret-press-with-auto-index-90932.html>https://fsreloading.com/lee-4-hole-turret-press-with-auto-index-90932.html $71.98 But the much more solid  Classic Cast is well worth the small price difference.

Gary

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Pigslayer posted this 22 November 2012

I've been reading a lot of reviews on the Lee classic turret press & about 99% of them “5 Star". Actually I can get one on ebay for $98.00 or the #90396 3-hole for $77.00 delivered.. Although I love the power & heft of my Lyman Crusher & will never give it up, I realy need a turret press for my .45 Long Colts & .38 Specials. I get tired of changing dies. I have a LEE challenger that I use for bullet sizing but don't like it for reloading in general although it WILL get the job done. My priming is done exclusively with the LEE Auto hand primer. Been using one for almost as long as I've been loading . . . I've found nothing better or faster. My only reason for hesitation in purchasing the Lee Classic Turret is that most of the reviews that I've read came from younger, new to reloading people that really may not know what to look for yet. I have read a couple of very bad reviews & wonder if that is due maybe to a factory defect or more than likely someone looking for a Dillon loader for the price of a LEE.

Pat

If someone else had of done to me what I did to myself . . . I'd have killed him. Humility is an asset. Heh - heh.

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onondaga posted this 22 November 2012

Pat, I bet I can debunk any complaint about the Classic Cast Turret press. Try me on that if you wish. I mean that seriously. The common complaint is the bushing for the indexing rod failing. This is done by ham handing the press and back jacking the operating handle mid stroke.  I don't think you would pull that rookie blunder and keep muscling the operating lever till you split a bushing! You ain't no dunderhead !!!

Also The safety Prime has all the advantage of the hand primer's feel if you wrap your thumb around the operating lever and your fingers around front press upright then squeeze.  I don't hold the ball handle for priming and prefer to squeeze, the feel is there and is great.

Gary

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Pigslayer posted this 22 November 2012

onondaga wrote: Pat, I bet I can debunk any complaint about the Classic Cast Turret press. Try me on that if you wish. I mean that seriously. The common complaint is the bushing for the indexing rod failing. This is done by ham handing the press and back jacking the operating handle mid stroke.  I don't think you would pull that rookie blunder and keep going till you split a bushing!

Also The safety Prime has all the advantage of the hand primer's feel if you wrap your thumb around the operating lever and your fingers around front press upright then squeeze.  I don't hold the ball handle for priming and prefer to squeeze, the feel is there and is great.

Gary How “Solid” is the feel of the press when sizing? As solid as the heavy cast “O” frame presses like my Crusher or the RCBS Rock Chucker? I really like “Solid". 

If someone else had of done to me what I did to myself . . . I'd have killed him. Humility is an asset. Heh - heh.

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onondaga posted this 22 November 2012

Pat, it is that solid as an “O” press,  There is an engineered .040” Float of the disks that aids in concentricity like a coaxial press. The die disks rotate in a horizontal steel “O” press head supported by 3 very substantial steel vertical posts. You may see the disk float upon operation, this is as designed. I like that , now that I understand it. The press won't bend cases out of concentricity as some totally rigid  presses can.   I can full size .375 H&H and .458 Win Mag easily with full to the shell holder sizing when I choose easily. Dirty as fired .500 S&W cases unlubed through a carbide sizer  die are a tiny stiff, maybe a 10 pound push,  but when I lube them  it feels like the cases aren't even there during sizing.

Operating lever length is adjustable also, I keep it about 2 inches less than maximum. I have never needed more leverage.

Gary

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Pigslayer posted this 23 November 2012

Been looking at a Lyman Tru-Line Jr. & wondering if anyone has experience with one. Plenty of dies available for them. Comments.

If someone else had of done to me what I did to myself . . . I'd have killed him. Humility is an asset. Heh - heh.

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Little Debbie posted this 24 November 2012

They are great little presses, but I've never tried to full length size a case with mine. I use it to neck size and expand for my .308 and .30/06 cast bullets. Shell holders are an issue too. I've got a spare and some shell holders if you are interested.

Matt

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Dale53 posted this 24 November 2012

Gary is spot on about the Lee Classic Turret press. You can change calibers in SECONDS, not minutes.

I have two Dillon 550B's that I use for volume loading of a variety of rifle and pistol calibers. However, if I only want to run a hundred or so, it's faster to run the Lee Classic Turret press if you have extra die turrets already set up.

You can load 150-200 rounds per hour with the Lee and the ammo is match quality if the operator is good.

I have used all of the various brands of turrets readily available and some no longer made - the Lee has the best design of all.

FWIW Dale53

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John Alexander posted this 24 November 2012

I also have and like the Lee Classic Turret Press. I load several different calibers and seldom load large numbers of rounds before changing. I have seven four hole disks so it is the equivalent of a 28 die station turret press for me.

My only minor complaint is that spent primers sometime jump out the slot in the ram instead of going down into the plastic tube. I fixed that in about ten seconds with a bit of tape.

My two cents worth.

John

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onondaga posted this 24 November 2012

http://www.castbulletassoc.org/view_user.php?id=6375>John Alexander:

"My only minor complaint is that spent primers sometime jump out the slot in the ram instead of going down into the plastic tube. I fixed that in about ten seconds with a bit of tape." John, since I started a batch of  Winchester 7.62X39 brass for my Remington Spartan single shot rifle, I've kept a log on loading the 200 pieces of brass for 12 loading cycles. That is 2,400 primers so far. Out of that 2,400, I have had to pick up 7 primers off the floor that jumped out of the slot in the ram of my Classic Cast Turret  Press.

7 jumped out spent primers of 2.400 does not cause me great concern, but I would really like a close-up picture of exactly where you put the bit of tape on your press that fixes the problem.

With the ram fully down, the slot is not exposed. There is no place to put a piece of anything across the slot. The ram going up opens the slot as the primer arm is activated open by gravity to open a space behind the primer cup for the spent primer to drop into the tube. I have only been able to guess that occasionally, 7 out of 2,400 times, there are some primers that defy gravity or for some unknown reason, change direction or bounce off of some time warped part that appears out of nowhere and curve up and outward  through through space in  the open slot. I don't get this, but it has happened  7 out of 2,400 times for me with 7.62X39 brass. Some of my calibers, this has not happened in  many more thousands. I have had a few jumpers in .458 Win Mag, but less of a ratio than the 7:2,400 in X39 Rooskie.

The press also makes a quiet DOOOIINNG musical sound very occasionally as a spent primer is pushed out. I can't figure that out either. It is cute. I wouldn't care if the press did it every time it punches a primer out, but it only makes the musical sound very sporadically. The musical sound has never coincided with a spent primer jumping, for your information.

Thank you, Please post a picture of your bit of tape on your press.

Gary

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tominct posted this 24 November 2012

 I've a Dillon turret, like it a lot. It has a shellplate that accepts several different cal handgun rounds. Get an extra die head and you could load them without much fuss.

 I know a guy that used a Lyman press, model unknkown. He only loaded 45 acp and 38 special so 6 holes were all that he ever needed. Standard shellholder swap and turn the turret 180 degrees and he was off and running. HTH.

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Duane Mellenbruch posted this 24 November 2012

The press also makes a quiet DOOOIINNG musical sound very occasionally as a spent primer is pushed out. I can't figure that out either. It is cute. I wouldn't care if the press did it every time it punches a primer out, but it only makes the musical sound very sporadically. The musical sound has never coincided with a spent primer jumping, for your information.

 

It might be due to the flash hole not in alignment with the decapping pin.  Either a problem in the case, or the case is not fully into the shell holder slot.   When you withdraw the case from the die, the decap pin gets a little snap of the release of pressure and you get a sound.   

I think I  get it when decapping the military cases with crimped in primers.  Not anything to get alarmed about so I ignore it.

Duane

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onondaga posted this 24 November 2012

http://www.castbulletassoc.org/view_user.php?id=55>Duane Mellenbruch: Thanks Duane, now I will check the flash hole when I hear the De-capping pin chime a tone!!! It is a cute sound, thanks for the reply.

Gary

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Duane Trusty posted this 24 November 2012

Pigslayer

I have had one of the old Lee 3 hole turret presses for about 30 years, have a Dillon 550 for most of my pistol needs, RCBS Press for swaging and case forming, and a Lee hand press for the range. Would not sell or trade any of them.

My limited use of a Lyman Tru-Line Jr. 25 years ago. Had problem finding the small thread dies and it is a light duty, neck size only press in my opinion.

Duane Trusty

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fryboy posted this 25 November 2012

even with a 7/8” upgrade the tru-line jr is indeed a lite duty/use unit , for a older lyman a spar-t is the brute , and well worth what they go for now , which,btw , is about what a classic cast turret cost , i've had quite a few presses ... the only one i miss ? the spar-t , in fact i offered to up-grade the feller who has it now with a classic cast and he turned it down , for twice the price the classic cast would still be holding it's own against even still more expensive turret presses , and the newer turret presses while having optional turrets do not change as quick or cost as little as the 4 hole turrets from lee , it is without a doubt the best value going in my humble opinion

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Ken Campbell Iowa posted this 25 November 2012

speed makes me nervous, but i did buy the single-action version classic cast .... about 10 seconds after i saw it ...i thought lee had left off a ” 1 ” in front of the price !

to put the c/cast in perspective,  my beloved ( bonanza ) trick twin guided inline press is about $400+ nowadays.grab the lee c.cast before they add that 1 !

ken

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John Alexander posted this 25 November 2012

Gary,

I don't have a picture and not sure I could get one that shows the transparent tape, but I think I can describe it.

First. time warps and worm holes into alternative realities happen a lot more often up here in northern Maine. In fact a lot of strange things seem to happen more often here. I think it's the northern lights. But my primers were hitting that imaginary thingee and then defying gravity a lot more often than yours apparently are -- maybe ten percent of the time but with no music unless you count my cussing.

Second. our presses must be a little different because with the handle fully up the big diameter part of my ran still has .4 inch exposed. That is where I have .4” of magic transparent tape (what used to be called Scotch Tape) across the slot.

Up on taking another look at the press. I think I could bend the handle and maybe make the large diameter part of the ram go down the other .4". But there is more than enough opening for 270 length cartridges as is and of course short strokes are good.

Because of the nature of time warps and zero gravity events at this latitude, this little piece of tape deflects every single primer (in the last 5,000 or so since I put on the tape) back and into the tube. This in spite of the fact that the slot in the ram is exposed both below and above (in the reduced diameter part of the ram) the magic tape.

John

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John Alexander posted this 25 November 2012

Ken,

Speed also makes me nervous at least while reloading. I always do one operation at a time in batches of 5,20,50 or whatever. (I'm sure this would change and I would get a progressive if I got into pistol or shotgun shooting or fell ill with a case of ARitus.)

However, having all my dies set at about the right adjustment and never having to find them and then wrestle them out of those infernal round Lee die boxes justifies a turret type press for the way I like to reload.

I also love my Bonaza that I use for all my collet dies which can be slipped into the slot without all the unscrewing.

John

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onondaga posted this 25 November 2012

http://www.castbulletassoc.org/view_user.php?id=6375>John Alexander:

John, I poster a video answer:    (put your sound on)

http://s30.beta.photobucket.com/user/rhymeswithwhat/media/pressvid.mp4.html>http://s30.beta.photobucket.com/user/rhymeswithwhat/media/pressvid.mp4.html

The video is in a new post also at: http://s30.beta.photobucket.com/user/rhymeswithwhat/media/pressvid.mp4.html>http://s30.beta.photobucket.com/user/rhymeswithwhat/media/pressvid.mp4.html

Gary

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Pigslayer posted this 25 November 2012

Well, I have a lot to think about . . . the problem with having too many choices. I'm torn between the old & the new as both deserve many credits. The LEE three hole is a no go. Although many like it, it's just to flimsy judging from videos of it being used. I love the little Lyman Tru-Line Jr and it would be perfect for my .45 Colt & .38 Special! But that would mean buying more dies. So it's going to be between the Lyman Spar-T and the LEE Classic Turret. We'll see.

     But then there is the Lyman All American . . . . . . . . .

If someone else had of done to me what I did to myself . . . I'd have killed him. Humility is an asset. Heh - heh.

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John Alexander posted this 25 November 2012

Gary,

Excellent way to communicate! The reason my solution didn't make any sense for you is that I hand prime with a Lee auto prime separately from sizing the cases and removed everything but the basics from my press. You are right there is no place for my small piece of tape solution if you use the priming feature on the press which I will admit looks pretty slick.

It is a good thing that flying primers are a rare event for your operation and can be ignored.

Thanks for the movie.

John

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Pigslayer posted this 25 November 2012

Well, after sitting here watching numerous videos concerning turret presses, I've come to a conclusion. First of all I was wrong about the LEE 3-hole press. When securely mounted to a solid bench it appears solid . . . at least with pistol cases. By the time that I would buy, pay shipping & outfit (an extra Turret or two) an older Lyman Spar-T press I'd be spending $100.00 plus. So now it's most certainly going to be LEE. The question is . . . which one. Money is a definite factor here so it's going to be an either 3-Hole or 4-hole turret & not the Classic Turret. I can get the 3 or 4-Hole Turret for $70.00 & change shipped. I think that that is going to be the way to go. Comments please?

If someone else had of done to me what I did to myself . . . I'd have killed him. Humility is an asset. Heh - heh.

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fryboy posted this 26 November 2012

save the cash until you can get the classic cast it's well worth the lil bit extra and it's way better , both for durability and value , unlike the older 3 & 4 hole it has a cast iron base vs. a much faster wearing cast aluminum base the primers being occasionally spit out wouldnt happen if the priming arm was in place , granted they need to make a dummy one without the primer stem,cup and spring for time one isnt priming so it doesnt catch the case when the ram is down , because i have two of the presses i removed the stem and cup , if there's a fault that's the only one i found ( other than they didnt make it years and years ago !!! ) the turrets are also reasonable and they do indeed change in a snap , the classic cast is well worth the extra $23 bucks and even at that it's still way cheaper than it's closest competitor

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Chargar posted this 26 November 2012

I use a Redding turret press and am well satisfied with it.

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Pigslayer posted this 26 November 2012

Chargar wrote: I use a Redding turret press and am well satisfied with it. Redding makes fine equipment . . . no doubt. I've owned Redding equipment that was lost by the wayside due to my SECOND divorce! That stuff is sorely missed! But . . . the strides that LEE precision has made in both quality & performance for the price Is unsurpassed. I simply cannot see spending the coin for either RCBS or Redding when I can get the same quality & performance from LEE. As I said, Redding is fine equipment as with RCBS but the price is out of my league.

If someone else had of done to me what I did to myself . . . I'd have killed him. Humility is an asset. Heh - heh.

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delmarskid1 posted this 27 November 2012

I've been using the Lyman turret press for years. I like the looks of the Lee for the priming application. The Lyman ain't much in that way.

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rjmeyer314 posted this 29 November 2012

I have two turret presses, a Herter's and a Hollywood senior turret. I haven't had the Hollywood press that long but I've found that I really like it. There is almost no play in the thing. I've compared the consistency of overall length between the Hollywood and my RCBS Ammocrafter press. The cartridges from the Hollywood are much more consistent in length.

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Pigslayer posted this 07 December 2012

Well, today I ordered my LEE turret press! Yahoo! No, I didn't order the Classic turret press. I ordered the standard 4-hole turret press and I think that I will be very pleased with it. I think that it wil be perfect for my .45 Colt, .38 Special & 9MM luger. I got it from Titan reloading for $71.00 + $13.00 shipping & it's already been shipped. Oh Boy!!!

If someone else had of done to me what I did to myself . . . I'd have killed him. Humility is an asset. Heh - heh.

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onondaga posted this 07 December 2012

Great,

 I bet you will be happy with it. Just remember, don't backjack the operating lever while the indexing pin is in the rotating phase of operation. That is the first mistake new owners do. That will screw up timing and break the indexing pin drive washer if you continue going the wrong way. The presses come nicely timed from Lee. Resetting timing is very easy to learn and do, familiarize yourself with that procedure. The Lee site has a video on that...It takes about 3 seconds. If you roughhouse the press you will have to reset the timing.

You will be using it a lot...keep your shell holder clean and have fun !!!

Gary

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Pigslayer posted this 07 December 2012

Gary, I really did a lot of research before making my choice. The Lyman Turret was definitly one I wanted but the price was just too much even on ebay. I watched many, many videos on u-tube of the LEE turrets in operation. I was worried about strength but the only thing that was flimsy were the benches that the press was mounted on.

If someone else had of done to me what I did to myself . . . I'd have killed him. Humility is an asset. Heh - heh.

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onondaga posted this 07 December 2012

http://www.castbulletassoc.org/view_user.php?id=6171>Pigslayer:

Ammo full sized from the Lee Turret will have better concentricity than the Lyman is capable of, and if you use Lee Collet neck sizing dies on bottle neck cartridges, the Lee has better concentricity than a co-axial press.

Gary

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Pigslayer posted this 09 December 2012

Well, I'm really looking forward to getting my new press. UPS tracking says that it will be delivered tomorrow. I'm going to have to order a few extra turrets. The accessories will be here later in the week from Natchez. I love new toys!

If someone else had of done to me what I did to myself . . . I'd have killed him. Humility is an asset. Heh - heh.

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onondaga posted this 09 December 2012

Pat, watch for sale on the turrets, I've gotten them as low as $8.99 at FS  LINK:

https://fsreloading.com/lee-precision-4-hole-turret-90269.html>https://fsreloading.com/lee-precision-4-hole-turret-90269.html

Holy cow, they are on sale for $7.98 !!!!! Right now.

And the safety prime kit for both primer sizes is on sale for  $24.98 :

https://fsreloading.com/lee-precision-tp-safety-prime-upkit-90042.html

crazy great price!

Gary

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Pigslayer posted this 10 December 2012

Just got home from work & my new LEE Turret Press was waiting on me. I opened it up & If I had had any doubts about the quality . . . they vanished immediately! This unit is very well made. The engineering of this unit is unsurpassed. When I ordered the press I knew that I would want the ERGO handle but figured I would buy it down the road. Guess what? It came with it! I can't believe that I got this for $71.00 + shipping!

If someone else had of done to me what I did to myself . . . I'd have killed him. Humility is an asset. Heh - heh.

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onondaga posted this 10 December 2012

http://www.castbulletassoc.org/view_user.php?id=6171>Pigslayer:

Hey! I want that handle! I wonder when they started including those. You made a great choice but it might bubble the paint operating on that stove..

Gary

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Pigslayer posted this 19 December 2012

Well, I got my new LEE turret press set up along with the Pro Auto Disk powder measure . . . I love the setup! The elastomer wiper on the Pro Auto disk measure is a vast improvement over the older auto disk . . . no spilled powder! The measure seems to be real consistant at holding to with 1/10th of a grain. I spent the extra money & bought the adjuatable disk. Without shipping I have about $150.00 invested in this rig . . . what a deal. That includes the press, powder measure, adjutable disk,.45LC powder thru expanding die, riser & primer feeds!!

If someone else had of done to me what I did to myself . . . I'd have killed him. Humility is an asset. Heh - heh.

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4570sharps posted this 02 October 2016

I see a few Lyman All Americans on ebay!

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bandsmoyer posted this 03 December 2023

I also have the Lee Classic Turret pres and am absolutly pleased with it.

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lotech posted this 03 December 2023

I realize this post is ancient and the original poster may have bought a turret press and worn it out by now, but....I've been using a Texan turret press for over forty years. It was very used when I bought it about 1980 or so. I load 10,000 -12,000 rounds of handgun ammo on it annually (except for a few years when I was using mostly progressive machines). The Texan still works fine. 

Got rid of  four progressives but continue with the Texan turret. I just don't load enough to justify a progressive. A turret is incredibly versatile especially if you like to load small batches for load development purposes. Certainly they are slower than progressives, but not enought to matter  unless you're loading 10,000 rounds a month. The turrets mentioned in the other posts are probably fine machines, but you can still find used Texan machines and they'll do anything the others will.  

 

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9.3X62AL posted this 03 December 2023

I'm late to the party--sorry about that.

I use a machine with a different take on the "turret press" concept--the Ponsness-Warren P-200 'MetalMatic' for pistol calibers.  There is a larger version for full-length rifle calibers as well.  <www.reloaders.com>

In these machines the shell holder moves between detent stops in an arc while the dies remain stationary.  Conventional 7/8"-14 dies are used, and RCBS-form shell holders are anchored in the swing arm beneath the die assembly.  I have used my P-200 since 2002 without a problem for over 100,000 rounds.  

 

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Millelacs posted this 03 December 2023

 

Thumbs up on the Lee Classic Turret press.

 

 

 

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