Adobo

  • 6K Views
  • Last Post 3 days ago
bandmiller2 posted this 03 October 2015

I spent a couple of years in the Phillipines in the navy and became quite fond of a dish they called adobo. Its ideal for odd game that may not be of gormet quality. You cut the meat be it furred or feathered put it in a pot with a little water, vinegar , and soy sauce. If you want to be fancy add bay leaves. Boil until tender serve with rice, put a little of the sauce on the rice. I have never seen anyone measure, use about equal quantities of the liquids or to your taste. Frank C.

Attached Files

Order By: Standard | Newest | Votes
mckg posted this 03 October 2015

Will have to try. Does it smell? I've got Filippinos as downstairs neighbors and friends who have invited me but I cannot match these weekly smells and what I have eaten; I just don't dare knocking at the door asking for samples :).

Attached Files

OU812 posted this 03 October 2015

Keep a close eye on your cat or dog.

Attached Files

Ed Harris posted this 04 October 2015

Or cane rat....

73 de KE4SKY In Home Mix We Trust From the Home of Ed's Red in "Almost Heaven" West Virginia

Attached Files

bandmiller2 posted this 04 October 2015

mckg, I've been married to one for 44 years much of the food is dandy but they have a habit of adding various fish sauces to food that I steer clear of. They have a condiment called bagoone that is fermented krill and salt. I steal a little and put it in my coon traps they can't resist it, their in the trap trying to hump it. Frank C.

Attached Files

mckg posted this 06 October 2015

That's funny, got to tell my friends...

Fish seems to get often involved. I mentioned “dead fish with lots of salt” once, they laughed and said they could do that too, but the evening's dishes would probably be more to my liking... :) Having access to meat might make for milder recipes in our countries.

Attached Files

bandmiller2 posted this 24 October 2015

Early on the wife fried a dried fish in the cast frying pan had every cat in the neighborhood on high alert. Next morning I fried an egg, kinda like a cigar butt in the punch bowl. Separate pan for the dried fish., Frank C.

Attached Files

gpidaho posted this 28 October 2015

I've sat down to dinner with folks that in leaner times had lost family to starvation, it makes them a lot less worried about what the meat was when it was walking. Even in the hardest of times we are blessed to have the food we have on our tables here. Don't forget to give thanks. Gp

Attached Files

  • Liked by
  • John F.
oscarflytyer posted this 28 October 2015

Basically what we add to Brunswick stew except Worcestershire sauce instead of Soy. Worcestershire is basically a type of fish sauce. I also use a lot of Asian fish sauce. As long as it is put in and cooked with the dish/stew, everybody likes it. They miss it if I omit it from my stir fry. Smells like hell as it is frying, but mellows out for great flavor. Last batch of Brunswick stew, used both Worcestershire and fish sauce. Little fish sauce goes a long way

Attached Files

  • Liked by
  • delmarskid
max503 posted this 2 weeks ago

Read somewhere that fried sardines are good.

They are not.

Very messy.

Just eat them out of the can.

Attached Files

Shuz posted this 2 weeks ago

What's a cane rat?

Attached Files

Boschloper posted this 2 weeks ago

My first job out of college most of the work force was Philippino. Great folks. Wonderful pot-lucks every holiday.  I think the best thing I ever had was a baked carp. 

Attached Files

  • Liked by
  • RicinYakima
  • delmarskid
RicinYakima posted this 2 weeks ago

After WWII, most of the Japanese that were interned never came back. Hundreds of Philippines move to the Yakima Valley and started families and are enculturated in the community. Great hard working people and some have become major political and economic powerhouses. 

Attached Files

Ed Harris posted this 2 weeks ago

Cane rats came to the PI as stowaways aboard ships from Africa, where the natives eat them. Slow cooking in a crock pot the meat is succulent and resembles pork shoulder. Also known as grass cutters their Pacific diet is mostly rice, so they naturally run fat.

73 de KE4SKY In Home Mix We Trust From the Home of Ed's Red in "Almost Heaven" West Virginia

Attached Files

  • Liked by
  • RicinYakima
Buttersdad posted this 2 weeks ago

I can't speak of Philippine cooking, but I can talk about smelly food. A little over 40 years ago I was stationed in South Korea at Camp Casey. We had a group of South Koreans in our unit called KATUSA's. Which stood for Koreans augmented to the US Army. They lived and worked with us. My unit were in quansit  huts like in Gomer Pyle. I walked in one day and the smell almost knocked me out. Some of my KATUSA friends were in there eating Winter Kimchi and offered me some. I was the usual obnoxious American and tried to chase them out. After I calmed down they still offered and I tried some. If you can get past the smell it is delicious. 

Since then I am willing to try a dish within reason. I still won't eat sashimi and I don't like squid.

Attached Files

max503 posted this 3 days ago

My first job out of college most of the work force was Philippino. Great folks. Wonderful pot-lucks every holiday.  I think the best thing I ever had was a baked carp. 


A friend told me they used to bake carp with tomatoes, butter, onions, etc and it was really good.  Wish I had a recipe.  

Attached Files

Close