casting ladles

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  • Last Post 26 June 2015
gpidaho posted this 03 June 2015

Friends:  I would like some advice and your preference as to casting ladles.  I own a Lyman and am aware of the Rowell products. Seems even the small Rowell#1 holds a pound of lead. I know,  you don't have to fill it but it still seems a little large.  My Lyman, well it just feels kind of clumsy (or it could be me) as I'm used to the bottom pour method.  So, if any of you have a link to or a picture of your favorite I would appreciate your input.   Thanks   GP

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grouch posted this 03 June 2015

I prefer my 50yr old Lyman ladle with the shorter handle. Grouch

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onondaga posted this 03 June 2015

http://castbulletassoc.org/view_user.php?id=8045>gpidaho

There is some logic to selecting a casting ladle size. You likely may have single and  double through 6 cavity molds. If you select a ladle that will hold 2 to 4 times the amount of metal for your mold that needs the most metal to fill all cavities, you will then have a ladle that is large enough for your needs. A smaller ladle than that cools too quickly to be thermodynamically efficient for your ladle casting application with just one ladle. The Rowell 1 pounder is a good selection for big bullet 6 cavity mold pouring.

Gary

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Tom Acheson posted this 03 June 2015

For use with a Paul Jones 415-grain single cavity mould, the old RCBS works well. But for most other multi-cavity moulds the Rowell ladle works very well. The Magma engineering 40-pound pot has an ID of 5” which helps for ladle use. The Lyman ID is 4 1/2". The old Lee 5-pounder is used to melt down wheel weights off to the side while doing regular bullet casting.

Tom

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gnoahhh posted this 03 June 2015

Geez, I thought everybody did what I do- ladle the lead into the mold in a lovingly fashion via a Tiffany silver spoon. :)

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LWesthoff posted this 03 June 2015

I am still using the Lyman ladle I started casting with, 50 some years ago. Used it for many years casting pistol bullets in a 4 cavity H&G mold. Now use it almost entirely for rifle, mostly .30 cal. but some .375 cal. but nothing over 2 cavity molds.

If you're going to cast with a 4 or six cavity large caliber mold, a Rowell ladle may make things a little easier, but otherwise a Lyman or RCBS regular ladle works just fine. I have an idea any ladle feels and works right after you use it enough to get used to it. One thing: even a Lyman or RCBS ladle holds too much lead for most 2 cavity molds. It helps to learn how full your ladle needs to be when casting with a one or two cavity mold.

Wes

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gpidaho posted this 03 June 2015

Thanks for the replys guys, I believe it's like Wes said, just a matter of getting use to the tools at hand. I got out my Lyman ladle, RCBS cast iron bowl and the Camp Chief one burner propane stove today and gave ladle casting a chance. Happy to say all worked very well for me. I've always just used my bottom pour Mag 20 up until now. As posted on another thread, I was having problems with spout freeze with an alloy containing babbit. This pushed me to the ladle and I'm glad for the nudge. Thanks Guys GP

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delmarskid1 posted this 04 June 2015

I like the RCBS. It has a square back side. This makes it easier for me to dmp any dross off of the ladle.

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operator posted this 04 June 2015

For about 35 years I have been using a home-made ladle made from a soda syphon gas cylinder. I cut off half the top and brazed on a handle made from the twisted wire of an industrial brush. Eight inches long makes a good balance as it sits nicely in the small Lee pot that I ladle cast with. Bore a hole in the spout after having a look at the size of your sprue hole and you are good to go. Also an easy way for a lefty to have a ladle that suits. Bullets up to 450 grains are no trouble, but could not keep a large six cavity mould hot.

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LWesthoff posted this 04 June 2015

Re: ladle pouring for southpaws; I believe RCBS ladles have been made for either hand use for some time now. (You can screw the handle into the ladle from either side.)

I think Lyman ladles are now made the same way, too.

Wes

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Mike H posted this 05 June 2015

I use one I made out of a small food can,about 2” wide and 2.5” deep.twisted fence wire for the handle,bent the side in a trifle to form a pouring lip.No need to fill it all the way to the top,4 and 6 cavity are easy. Mike.

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noylj posted this 26 June 2015

I would never NOT use a bottom pour. If I had to use a ladle, I would first use the Lyman, just because I have never read any one having a complaint about it. Obviously, a lefty may need something made for them.

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billglaze posted this 26 June 2015

Years ago, when I began casting, I used the Lyman ladle. It was so handy, what with not having to let go of the mould, to tap the sprue plate, etc. and just seemed so natural, that I doubt if I could even use a ladle left-handed, (even though I do everything else as a lefty.) It would take a lot of re-training. But, after many years of using a bottom-feed pot, and force-feeding my moulds, the thought doesn't even occur to me now. I'm spoiled, I guess.

Bill

In theory, there's no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is. My fate is not entirely in Gods hands, if I have a weapon in mine.

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