stuff for competition

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Ross Smith posted this 3 weeks ago

I'm thinking about trying to get to an actual competition this year. I've never done that except at mountain man Rendezvous. What do I need  and what would be desireable in the way of equipment besides my rifle and ammo and rest?

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RicinYakima posted this 3 weeks ago

First is a good spotting scope so you can see your holes at 200 yards. Not only power, but clarity.

A timer if you are a slow shooter.

A good sense of humor, as we are friendly people.

Be  forward and greet and meet people, as that is the primer reason to go to a real match. 

Listen to what people say. It may not be right, but you can learn from their errors.\

 

 

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Aaron posted this 3 weeks ago

Hey Ross, they don't do a blanket dance at these events. Sorry. 134

Snacks and drinks are advisable too. Writing tablet to record data. Sight adjustment tools and sight inserts.

 

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John Alexander posted this 3 weeks ago

Two or three wind flags and some practice using them before the first match.  Although you can get along pretty well by "borrowing" the wind flags to either side of you. Bring more ammunition than you think you will need. It is easy to get carried away going back to the sighter.  You can always use it afterward and see how much better it shoots than it did in the match.

John

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Larry Gibson posted this 3 weeks ago

Concealment is not cover.........

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Bud Hyett posted this 3 weeks ago

One hundred rounds of ammunition at the match is a good start. I often shoot between 60 and 70 rounds in a match counting sighters, but changing wind or light conditions can mean going back to the sighter and shooting nearly the entire box. 

Another tip is reserving four rows on one side of the box in order to track your record rounds on target. Looking at the position in the box to correlate to the target number I'm shooting keeps me from not shooting a record target. 

Good luck, may all your bad shots be in practice. 

Farm boy from Illinois, living in the magical Pacific Northwest

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Ross Smith posted this 3 weeks ago

How about things like a wheelbarrow to get all my stuff to the shooting line,etc?

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RicinYakima posted this 3 weeks ago

How about things like a wheelbarrow to get all my stuff to the shooting line, etc?

 

Get there early and park close!

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John Carlson posted this 3 weeks ago

If close parking is not an option, those folding canvas wagons work quite well.

John Carlson. CBA Director of Military Competition.

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Wm Cook posted this 3 weeks ago

Ross could I ask what class you were thinking about competing in and what firearm you were going to be using?  I think this thread could help a lot of folks that are on the edge of jumping into competition, be it military or be it benchrest.  The input given so far is good but I think its a meaty topic that could use some more bantering around.  Just my thoughts.  Thanks, Bill C.

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Ross Smith posted this 3 weeks ago

Bill: You're right. At first I thought that somebody would actually write an article for the Fouling Shot. So far the answers have been concise.

I'm planning on shooting one of John Ardito built rifles in .308x1.625 in the UNR class. They weigh 17 lbs so I have shoot against the big boys. I'll probably shoot bumped bullets that are breach seated. If anyone has a good desighn for a breach seating tool, let me know. Right I'm using a blank cartridge case filled with lead and shove the bullet in with the bolt. It's clumsy but works. Curious about reloading at the shoot, cleaning the rifle, pads, chair?, table, yatta yatta. I also have a 30-06 that has been rebarrled and would have to shoot in the heavy class. It has a sporter stock.

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ten-mile posted this 3 weeks ago

Take stock of what you already have and use it.  Once you have been to a match or two you will see what needs an upgrade and what new stuff you might need.  Have ear plugs as well as electronic muffs.  Have a good scope with plenty of power. Get a 36" drill rod (with squared ends) just under bore size in case something gets really stuck.  A plastic faced hammer.  Mosquito dope and sunscreen,  Kroil or something for what ails you plus a little moly grease for bolt lugs.  Have a stool you like because you will be sitting on it a long time. 

Make sure which target is yours,  At my first match not so long ago I put some shot on the sighter of the shooter to my left.

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Wm Cook posted this 2 weeks ago

Ross this is a dollar short and more than a few days but here's my take on necessary range gear. 

  • Three loose pieces; 1) wind flag stands, 2) One bundle that includes cleaning rods (22 cal, 30 cal), and my tube for the wind flag tails, 3) my rifle.
  • One 16" x 22" heavy reinforced cardboard box for wind flags, backstop for the flying brass, spare targets, stapler etc.
  • One heavy plastic crate for all of my shooting bench gear (front rest, rear rest wrist bags, bench carpet etc).
  • One milk crate stays with me near my bench and it has my cleaning gear and my emergency tool needs.
  • Two milk crates carry all of my reloading equipment. 

I stopped bringing my Kennedy loading box but most of the folks who reload at the range use them.  I converted over to trays and have my brass sized and primed before I leave for the range.  Brass is prepped in quantities of 200 pcs.  All I need for reloading at the range is powder, bullets, Wilson dies and the necessary odds and ends.  At last years Nationals only one in four loaded at the range.  I guess its what you get used to.  Hard to imagine working up loads without loading at the range. 

You'll see some things missing that some others will have.  I don't use a timer some others due.  What Bud said about having a loading block to keep track of how many shots you have on record is crucial.  I'm anal to the point that I even have tags on each crate and box so I can do a quick inventory before heading out.  Its a pain in the butt getting all the way out to the range and find something missing that you absolutely have to have.      

 

 

 

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Ross Smith posted this 2 weeks ago

Thanks Bill, that was great. I printed it.

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