Sage's Outdoors

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  • Last Post 15 December 2020
John Carlson posted this 02 December 2020

Just discovered this place.  They make their own gas checks and offer a variety at reasonable prices.  I ordered a few to try out.  Of course, now I'll sit here looking at them until spring!sealed

 

Anybody familiar with them?

John Carlson. CBA Director of Military Competition.

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Bud Hyett posted this 02 December 2020

Yes. I've ordered Gator gaschecks from them, prompt service.

I can find no difference between Gator and Hornady gas checks. 

Farm boy from Illinois, living in the magical Pacific Northwest

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John Schauf posted this 02 December 2020

I have used the gas checks Sages makes.  I don't care for them because they are not flat on the bottom.  They are convex and they don't always go on straight.  

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John Carlson posted this 02 December 2020

Do you seat them in a lubrisizer or a nose-first push through die?

John Carlson. CBA Director of Military Competition.

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Bud Hyett posted this 03 December 2020

I've noticed the occasional gascheck not seating square or with a dimpled bottom with all brands, but have yet to use Sage's gascheck. Testing showed a bad-looking gascheck for any reason threw that shot out of the group, usually with a pronounced flier. 

To avoid this, going to an interim step using the SAECO lubrisizer gascheck seater swing-out arm. After partial seating, I check each gascheck for the start for uniform base seating. The concept is getting the gascheck started right and to identify any with cupped bases. 

As an example, for .30 caliber, the bullet and gascheck goes into a .312  die far enough to have a firm hold, but not complete. If there is a problem, the bullet is set back in and pushed to completion to square it up or iron it out. These are set aside to use as sighters or barrel foulers.

The next step is running the bullet through the NOE nose first sizing die; .310 for Production and .311 for Military. As we have warm sunny days this winter, I will be testing the target results of this approach in several Production rifles and several Military rifles. At the conclusion, I hope to have a Fouling Shot article with targets and data analysis.

I've used nose-first sizing in my Star lubrisizer, however, this is messy and saves no time when you add the cleanup of the bullets. 

Farm boy from Illinois, living in the magical Pacific Northwest

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John Schauf posted this 03 December 2020

I use a gas check seater in my lubrisizer.  Bud, I can give you some of these Sage gas checks the next time at Paul Bunyan.

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Ross Smith posted this 03 December 2020

I prefer sage's checks and now that I've tried the aluminum ones, I think they go on straighter. Jest my 2cents.

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Bud Hyett posted this 03 December 2020

I use a gas check seater in my lubrisizer.  Bud, I can give you some of these Sage gas checks the next time at Paul Bunyan.

Yes - That will possibly be in March at the First Military rifle Match. 

Farm boy from Illinois, living in the magical Pacific Northwest

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BigMan54 posted this 03 December 2020

Only way I've ever seated gaschecks is with a Lyman 450 or 45. In the days before the Lyman gascheck seater attachment; we used a Rube Goldberg "thingy" my Dad had from another caster.  Only thing He still used the OLD Comet press for.   

Long time Caster/Reloader, Getting back into it after almost 10yrs. Life Member NRA 40+yrs, Life S.A.S.S. #375. Does this mean a description of me as a fumble-fingered knuckle-draggin' baboon. I also drool in my sleep. I firmly believe that true happiness is a warm gun. Did I mention how much I HATE auto-correct on this blasted tablet.

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John Carlson posted this 14 December 2020

Curious about the aluminum checks.  I've not known anyone to use them and wondered if they have an advantage other than being a bit cheaper.

John Carlson. CBA Director of Military Competition.

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RicinYakima posted this 14 December 2020

If you are using a forming die after lubing, they are much easier to get square edged corners than gilding metal checks.

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Rich/WIS posted this 14 December 2020

Switched to the Gator checks years ago and have seldom had an issue seating the checks and usually my fault for starting them cockeyed.  

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mashburn posted this 14 December 2020

Hello,

our Norwegian member, Spindrift, posted an easy way of seating gas checks squarely a few months ago. I use his method all of the time since reading the post and have had excellent results with it. I now use nothing else.

Mashburn

David a. Cogburn

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GP Idaho posted this 14 December 2020

I've used Sage's gas checks with complete satisfaction. I use the Noe gas check seating die and crimp the check on with a Lee push through size die or a Noe size bushing.  Seating checks tight and square is much easier for me with this tooling. Gp

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max503 posted this 15 December 2020

Gas check seater?  How does that work?

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GP Idaho posted this 15 December 2020

Max:  Al at Noe bullet moulds makes a great gas check seating die that presses the check on tight and square plus an added tool that fits in the press ram like a shell holder to allow the use of a nose punch to push the bullet into a push through sizer base first. Al I believe is a site sponsor.  Also available from Noe is an adapter that allows the use of Noe sizing bushings in the Lee APP press. Very handy tooling. Check the out at noebulletmoulds.com   Gp

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