how do we........

  • 679 Views
  • Last Post 2 days ago
  • Topic Is Solved
Ross Smith posted this 2 weeks ago

Right now in Utah hunters are sighting in their modern muzzleloaders, at up to $5 per shot. I try to get some to cast their own and either paper patch or grease lube. But no, not a single convert yet. The same with recreational target shooters. Most don't-won't reload let alone switch to cast bullets. I've even offered to do the work for them. I do have one friend in town that has switched to casting his own, but can't get him to join the CBA.

 

So how do we get our message out?

Attached Files

Order By: Standard | Newest | Votes
Aaron posted this 2 weeks ago

I don't know that we can anymore. We have been branded and labeled by a socialist media as domestic terrorists, gun loving murderers, rednecks, racists, and other vile things - all of which are not true. Look at the advertising alone in the American Rifleman. What used to be a father and son at the reloading bench promoting the hobby has been replaced by the tattooed, bearded, "operator" promoting firepower and machismo.

The younger generation has no time for hobby. They want immediate gratification through an online purchase on Amazon. Have the bullets shipped. No casting for them. Those that decided to try to cast gave up when they boogered something up and leaded their barrels horribly with an incorrect alloy. They learned their hobby through online "experts" whilst doing the TicToc dance.

At the range, I am a dinosaur. When I load cast bullets into my M44 Moisin Nagant, I can see the other shooters grinning and cringing. Those who do ask and I inform them that with a proper alloy and reduced pressure, the barrel will not be leaded, smile and walk away in apparent disbelief.

We no longer have any prime time sportsman shows on national television. The Olympic shooting events are NEVER televised. There are no more intramural school shooting teams or leagues. Shooting and all things shooting related are now classified as terrorist activity engaged in only by domestic terrorists or radical right wing supporters.

Tools of the trade are only now becoming available again on the market but at significantly higher prices. Reloading now, like SCUBA, is becoming an upper middle-class activity. My LGS used to carry all kinds of reloading powders. My last can of Unique was purchased for $15.99 at Scheels. The other day I ordered 2 pounds of Unique from MidwayUSA, one of the only online places to get it. At $119.45 for two pounds, that works out to $60 per pound. Online purchases mean shipping, hazmat fee, tax, and of course the product charge. You can safely assume those will be the last two pounds of powder I buy online.

Prices like these will SEVERELY restrict who can reload. The loss of wheel weight lead will restrict those who cast bullets. I have no desire to cast zinc bullets or pay exorbitant prices for bullet alloy shipped to my doorstep. If you are one of the few fortunate people who live next to a powder factory or a lead mine, good for you. Most of us have to have it shipped to our country estate. 

The cost of goods is one thing but I do not sense the willingness to "roll your own" in the younger generations. They want to buy it and they want it right now.

Now I will relate something funny. I have decided to roll my own English cartridges like those highlighted in Brett Gibbons book The English Cartridge. I had to order 100% rag paper online and did so. The description on the paper never mentioned the fact that this very expensive paper was graph paper. Now my 1853 Enfield paper cartridges are made with 100% rag graph paper. I can't wait to get these on the range and explain to those that are interested that in 1860, the English used graph paper for their cartridges! innocent

Attached Files

  • Liked by
  • delmarskid
RicinYakima posted this 2 weeks ago

Not disagreeing with anything Aaron says, but my perspective is that almost all people under the age of 50 want to be looking at an electronic screen and being entertained or "shooting" outside. Shooting means buying loaded ammo on the credit card and banging it away as fast as possible. 

And the expense of money and time to reload, especially cast bullets, is not getting better. I have a machinist acquaintance, who says he can work two hours overtime and make enough to buy 200 rounds of 9MM and shoot all afternoon, why would I reload my own?

Attached Files

NH_Jim posted this 2 weeks ago

 One method that has worked for me it to demonstrate the destructive power of a muzzleloader on an everyday item such as a plasma TV.  A muzzleoader will blow a big hole through a plasma TV. (I know ... can't shoot items on the range ...). As you know a high velocity round will go through most items with little fanfare.  A lead slug from a muzzleoader ... Bam ... big hole - lost of mess.  That sales pitch works.  From there you lead them by the hand down the road of muzzleoading and then casting.  All of the people I got into casting did so because the big bore slugs are not available much anymore.  It takes a year or two of mentoring but they get hooked. Casting bullets under .50 cal come later, once they are into casting.  One person at a time.  Just my two cents.

Attached Files

  • Liked by
  • Ross Smith
Ed Harris posted this 2 weeks ago

At the risk of getting political, the brainwashing of our youth, the destruction of work ethic, developing a dependent welfare class, driving instant gratification while supply issues and pure greed drive the cost of shooting beyond the means of working class people is the plan. Discourage hunting and shooting so that the young won't carry the torch. Then wait for the Baby Boomers to die off and there will be no one left who cares. The young will suck the government teat and inherit their Socialist utopia. No further comment along these lines. Dave delete if this crossed the line.

73 de KE4SKY In Home Mix We Trust From the Home of Ed's Red in "Almost Heaven" West Virginia

Attached Files

JeffinNZ posted this 2 weeks ago

I think the point is being missed here. 

Why would those casual shooters have any interest in the CBA?  They clearly have the means to buy ammo.  You can't instill curiosity in those that are not curious.  Further, that they don't want to pursue our interests is no failing on their part.  

Kind of akin to knocking those that drink beer but don't brew it themselves.

Cheers from New Zealand

Attached Files

Waleone posted this 2 weeks ago

 Ed, sadly you are 100% correct!

Attached Files

  • Liked by
  • Ed Harris
  • Ross Smith
Ross Smith posted this 2 weeks ago

Thanks for the replies guys, you are all correct. @00 rounds of 9mm won't last all afternoon. Just today 2 young fellows showed up at the range and went thru several hundred rounds semi auto in half an hour. At least they picked up their brass. 

The obvious group to target is the inline ML guys. But in my experience they won't even listen.

Attached Files

Little Debbie posted this 2 weeks ago

What Ed said is true; tax and regulate the shooting sports to a point that prices a lot of people out of the pastime. If I wasn’t reloading with components that I acquired over many years I wouldn’t be shooting much today. Until the recent increase in supply and lower cost of .22 RF I haven’t been shooting much of it for a couple of years. This used to be a staple of family gatherings along with shooting clays pigeons. The price of shotgun shells has made reloading 12 ga trap loads economically sensible again. With the constant media barrage that guns are bad, hunting is destroying the planet and lead in any form is lethal to humans it’s no wonder young people don’t take casting up. It’s seen as time consuming and dangerous.

Add the ignoramasus’ blaring on the internet that shooting lead will cause a Glock to explode and by extension all lead bullets are bad, state laws against use of lead in hunting ammunition etc it makes me wonder why scrap lead and molds are in such high demand. Hoarders I guess.

Finding a place to shoot has gotten harder too. All the informal ranges in the county I grew up in are gone. I have land to shoot on. If I had to go to a gun club or public or private range I wouldn’t shoot much. The quality of the individual populating these places has gone way down. The knowledge base is poor/false/ ignorant thanks to the internet. Firearms handling safety is poor and it makes me nervous. You see all this at gun shows and gun stores too. My kids reload but don’t cast. I’ve had many friend that reload but none that cast. This has changed since I started shooting in CBA matches. People at the range I usually shoot at show no real interest in cast bullet shooting or competition. They just want us old farts to get off the range so they can shoot their AR 15s

Attached Files

RicinYakima posted this 2 weeks ago

Our local rifle and pistol club, second oldest active NRA club, is in transition. They no longer support Hi-Power, Bullseye, Benchrest, Cowboy. What they do have is a 100 active members who want to shoot two kinds of black pistol games; one is speed shooting falling plates and one where you jump around a shoot things ten feet away. 

They are almost all reloaders with Dillon presses, but buy components and don't cast. The reason is time. None of these guys are over about 45 and in the middle of their working lives. Don't give up on them, as they will have some become casters at some point in their lives. I hope. 

Attached Files

  • Liked by
  • Glaciers
sluggo posted this 2 weeks ago

You would think that the higher cost of ammo would increase the number of people that reload. It might have something to do with that four letter word so prevalent in todays society "lazy".

Attached Files

  • Liked by
  • JeffinNZ
RicinYakima posted this 2 weeks ago

No, I think the four letter word is "time". There is tremendous pressure on people under 40 to be "social" every spare minute. 

Attached Files

Aaron posted this 2 weeks ago

I think the point is being missed here. Why would those casual shooters have any interest in the CBA?  They clearly have the means to buy ammo.  You can't instill curiosity in those that are not curious.  Further, that they don't want to pursue our interests is no failing on their part.  Kind of akin to knocking those that drink beer but don't brew it themselves.

 

Jeff, I believe that actually IS the point. Why lower curiosity in the art of casting/reloading in the shooting community at large with the younger folks? The percentage of shooters who begin casting and reloading is dropping below a sustainable level. Your beer analogy is accurate but I always enjoyed tasting beer brewed by home brewers and appreciated their work. Brewing beer is not my "thing" if you will, but those who do has remained a constant percentage of the population - I think. We shooters on the other hand are seeing diminishing numbers of competitive shooters, casters, and dedicated handloaders.

It's hard to put in words of course and is better discussed at the club house rather than in a forum. Alas, keep brewing, casting, and loading away! Man, that latest article in Handloader magazine on the 300 Rook has me wondering.

Attached Files

  • Liked by
  • Ross Smith
sergeant69 posted this 2 weeks ago

wish i could shoot pistol "all afternoon" and only use up 200 rds! especially in a modern semi auto.

Attached Files

  • Liked by
  • Ross Smith
Lee Guthrie posted this 2 weeks ago

JEFF, maybe exactly what you said.  I LOVE to brew my own, preferably all grain.  Besides enjoying the end product, I get the same satisfaction from the home brewed beer as I do from my cast bullet handloads.

Unfortunately, I am an aging Boomer, and I fear that Ed is correct.  frown

Attached Files

  • Liked by
  • Ross Smith
  • JeffinNZ
hporter posted this 2 weeks ago

I think another factor limiting the interest in reloading is the high cost of components. Primers and powder are very expensive at the moment.  And not necessarily readily available.

We cast, so the cost of projectiles can be mitigated. But someone new to the hobby would have to pay dearly for factory projectiles, if they can find them.

It must be difficult right now for a young person or a person of meager means, to try to budget for a reloading press, a scale, and dies and with prices of the equipment such as they are.  Not to mention a melting furnace, molds and sizers if they were to try out casting their own.

I joined the CBA to support an organization that supports a hobby I love.  I don't shoot in the competitions, but the wealth of information on this forum and in the Fouling Shot is well worth the cost of the membership alone.

Attached Files

  • Liked by
  • Aaron
  • Glaciers
John Alexander posted this 2 weeks ago

I agree with a lot, but not all, said so far. But to add just a bit to soften this sympathy of gloom there are places when CB shooting is growing and the new shooters aren't all drawing social security.  Region 3 and 4 have both added matches and active shooters in the last few years.  We have also had more new young (under 65 but several under 35) enter our nationals in the last 4 or 5 years than in any similar period I can remember in the last thirty.

This is not to say that black blasters and auto pistols at bayonet range aren't  what most shooters seem to want to shoot now and we have areas where we have lost CBA shooters and matches. At our local club/public range where I shoot and serve as RSO In five years I have only seen one shooter using cast bullets that he cast and only a few using the store bought variety in rifles and not many in pistols either. The CBA recruitment cards I supply a few gun shops don't disappear very fast.

As for the young generation going to hell, old Greeks and Romans, and every set of old people since, have been saying and writing that for at least the last 2,500 years. Funny how our grandkids seem to be OK but others are all lazy and no good. I think the young will be OK. Whether the corruption and gouging in the primer supply line will be eliminated any time soon is another question.

John

Attached Files

  • Liked by
  • Glaciers
Tom Acheson posted this 2 weeks ago

Some different observations.

 

When I joined (1978) the club, we had a self imposed limit of (125) members. Over time that limit has progressively grown. Today’s limit is (1500). Despite that growth, seldom do I go to the range and see very many people shooting. We have (4) positions on our 200-meter range (where I spend most of my time), I am usually alone or share it with only one other shooter. Our 20-position 100-yard range is the most popular range but is never full to capacity. On my drive home I often ask myself where are some other shooters?

 

I hear about muzzle loader shooters using our club but I have never seen one. If a new person witnesses a muzzle loader in action, it’s not surprising to form the somewhat incorrect conclusion that the process is slow….because it is!…..I’m not interested in bullet casting if that’s what I do with them…..they need more data points to unfreeze the muzzle loader images.

 

We are open to the public on weekends during the summer and then starting in early October we are open daily for public use (for a fee). Quite a few of our customers are sighting in their deer hunting rifles. Want to feel a bit nervous about shooting behavior? Try being an RSO during public use!

 

But there is hope. Contrary to what has been noted, I watched the biathlon (skiing and shooting) during the last Winter Olympics. The event was televised several times during span of all of the events. The fastest growing high school sport in our state (Minnesota) is trap shooting. Our club has three trap fields and we schedule in (5) different schools during the spring and into summer. And…our newest CBA match shooter is (13) years old.

 

Expressions such as….never….no more….all things….only promote negativity and convey an absence of hope or positiveness. Despite being a “boomer” the old phrase “all things in moderation” can see some application here. Yes, prices for most things have risen. What have our salaries and paychecks experienced? They too have risen. It’s up to us to work on the conversion process and even though the youth endanger themselves by constantly staring at what’s in their hand and not paying attention to things around them (ex. traffic), it is possible to get their attention instead of frequently criticizing them.

 

It takes work, coaching and patience and not expect to convert small groups of people in one sitting.

 

Tom

 

Attached Files

  • Liked by
  • Glaciers
Idahocaster posted this 2 weeks ago

I'm 45, so I expect that puts me on the younger end of the CBA membership spectrum. I started casting about 12 years ago. I had a great shooting and casting mentor (my grandpa) who introduced me to reloading and casting. Without his encouragement and help I probably wouldn't have ever started. Now I admit I am odd for my generation. I don't care for semi autos, rifles or handguns. Give me a revolver, lever gun, or bolt action any day. Point is, we need to be willing to share. Not everyone will be interested, but some will.

Attached Files

RicinYakima posted this 2 weeks ago

I love to share may experiences with bullet casting, until their eyes roll back into their heads.big_grin

 

My shooting buddy, Joe and I were practicing for postal matches about 20 years ago. The guy at the end of the line was shooting jacketed bullets in some type of fancy new hunting rifle. While he was scoping out our targets, he introduced himself and could not believe we were shooting mod-iron military rifles with smaller groups than he was doing with a $1000 outfit. Joe let him shoot his 1891 Mauser and ammo and the new guy shot his smallest group of the day. He ended up shooting cast bullets for ten years and is a loyal CBA member.

Attached Files

Fitzpatrick posted this 2 weeks ago

I have several friends that are trying to get into reloading but with the supply issue of components they get discouraged right off the bat and won't even try locating powder or primers then when I tell them about some I have found their reply is I will get it next week to which my reply is you'll be too late.

Attached Files

JimmyDee posted this 2 weeks ago

Try being an RSO during public use!

Or a Glock Shooting Sports Foundation day at the range!

 

Handling firearms and loaded magazines behind the line.  Seated while waiting their turn, loaded and ready -- including one who filled his magazine with the cartridges backward because "they go in easier that way."

Attached Files

  • Liked by
  • Ross Smith
Rich/WIS posted this 2 weeks ago

Over the last 30 plus years have been a memeber of two clubs, one in WI and one here in KY and the situation was about the same at both.  A few reloaders (more in WI than KY) and very few who cast their own. This is not the influence of current price/availablity of tools and components, some shooters are just not interested.  I am in SE KY and even before the current insanity reloading supplies were thin on the ground and the internet was the only reliable source.  

Attached Files

  • Liked by
  • Ross Smith
sergeant69 posted this 2 weeks ago

somewhat off topic but not much............

on a FB site a guy was showing off a chair he got for his kid to sit in and hunt this year from. elk and deer. it had an articulating arm with a rifle rest for butt and forearm and the rifle had a waaay too long bbl. big scope. was being fawned over by others comments. wished they had a chair like that. i disagreed, saying how putting that thing in a luxury blind wasn't hunting. he got pissed and said he will do anything, whatever it takes, to ensure his kid gets a deer and elk on his first hunt. i very briefly related how my first hunt actually entailed climbing a mountain predawn, being shown how to track, be patient, quiet etc etc. and how to enjoy the outdoors part of it regardless of success. actual hunting. he went ballistic, asked how did i expect a SIX year old to hold a .243 rifle by himself, without a rest. went down hill from there. others chimed in accusing me of being a bitter old man living in an outdated world with no concept of how things worked in the modern world. the outdoors/nature part of it being totally ignored. only one guy agreed said how you needed to be able to hold and shoot a gun unaided before going hunting. then it got personal. same old story. when you your argument fails start the name calling and insults. anyhow....THIS above all else brought home how nowdays everyone gets a trophy, instant gratification, the less effort the better, etc. all the above posts about diminishing interest in reloading, casting, et all is adding to a bleak future for the sport. however, if you're a gangbanger in a blue state/city  ur good!

Attached Files

alphabrass posted this 2 weeks ago

I was introduced to the CBA by finding issues of the Fouling Shot in the magazine rack of a used book store.  The magazine and subsequent CBA membership rekindled my interest in bullet casting.

The range I shoot at and my favorite gun shop both have places to display free for the taking printed material.  If there were some excess copies of the Fouling Shot available I'd put them out.  I'd be willing to pay to have some shipped to me.

alphabrass

Attached Files

  • Liked by
  • Ross Smith
sluggo posted this 2 weeks ago

I think another factor in the lack of participation is how post boomers have been taught in school. I worked at a large (2500 student) high school. By the time i retired all the blue collar shop classes were gone. The new gen kids were geared toward white collar careers. They are unfamilar with tools and would rather work with what they know.

Attached Files

Samari46 posted this 2 weeks ago

I'll be 76 this October and to be truthful my shooting has gone way down. Still pay me dues at the club, but have used the local sheriff's range of late. Much closer to the house. And shoot more pistol and revolvers than rifles. Our club has about 850 members and I doubt that more than 50 cast and shoot their own bullets. I do cast for my M27 Moisin Nagant rifle. Not all that many of our members are familiar with Moisins. Going to start casting with my 1944 M44 carbine. This should be fun. Frank

Attached Files

  • Liked by
  • Ross Smith
SkinnerD posted this 2 weeks ago

Some interesting thoughts and stories. I grew up barefoot on a Dairy farm in New Zealand where there were no barns for cows, they lived in the paddocks and trudged to and fro from the milking shed, in my day,with a kid and a dog hurrying them up from behind - a 120 cow farm was economic then. Now its 700 cows plus and everything automated but mostly the cows still trudge to and fro. I digress.

I started shooting with my grandfather at age 4. I was a biggish enough lad but fortunately the.22 BA was a little "ladies" rifle, my grandmother's, and I could carry and even point it. However, the only time I got to shoot it was down the back of the farm, lying prone on a grassy rise, aiming at a stick against a dry clay bank. One round at a time being passed to me by Grandpa. No fancy chair. And it wasn't until I was 10 that I got to shoot anything live, and that was blackbirds with a 500fps springer air rifle. At 12, I progressed to my dad's Lithgow Model 12 BA 6 shot repeater which I still have today. I cleaned out the rabbits and hares in the neighbourhood, not to mention a few headshot Brown and California quail. No deer in our woods unfortunately. Along came Uni, a wife and 2 kids, a corporate career including 5 years in the US. I owned rifles in that time but shot little..they gathered dust in the back of the wardrobe. In the US I scratched an itch and got into pistols. In all those years there was never any sense or interest in doing something like reloading my own cartridges let alone casting projectiles. I was also a flyfisherman and that was my consuming interest for 25 of those years. Yes, I tied my own flies. Returning to NZ in my late 40s I took up Pistol shooting seriously. And reloading. Simple economics and the value of time made a Dillon 550 for Pistol sensible and a Lee single stage for rifle of interest. But with locally produced cast there was no financial impetus for casting my own. Nevertheless I bought up moulds and gear and lead etc over the years. I've threatened to start for some time but life's interventions got in the way. This summer I expect to melt my first lead since I made sinkers over a fire at age 10. I will be 68. I now own and reload for more calibres than I care to admit at the dinner table.

(Cont below..)

John - New Zealand

Attached Files

  • Liked by
  • Ross Smith
SkinnerD posted this 2 weeks ago

(Continued)

My son, in his 40s watches with interest. But with a young family, a busy corporate life and a working wife, not to mention a heavy mortgage, he simply does not have time to shoot enough rounds to warrant reloading let alone casting. Like the guy re the overtime, the justification to take either up is not a monetary one, irrespective of the price of ammo. He can afford to buy what he needs, if its available.

There are only a couple of reasons to reload and cast that I see as relevant.

For reloading Pistol you have to be shooting high volumes to get a financial return. Otherwise you will reload because you love doing it or because its the only way you can get the ammo you need. Perhaps one other reason. In our country over the counter ammo purchases are recorded. Nuff said.

For rifle, few people who don't compete put enough lead downrange to warrant reloading - no matter the cost of a box of ammo. If you don’t get thru 20 rds a year why would you? In that respect there is another discussion to be had as to how effective a shooter/hunter you can be with that amount of time on the trigger but another day for that. And for those who do compete, even with the high current prices of ammo, if you are in well paid employment, its just a cost of your sport. Golfers don't make their own golf balls.

So the real driver for reloading comes from the perceived benefits. Cost if you shoot high volume, or, if you are cash poor but time rich. Availability if you can't buy off the shelf or if you are chasing decimal points in MOA. After that the only thing left is fascination. I reload and I will cast mostly because it fascinates me.

Historically, the broad interest and engagement in reloading, and casting was driven by something I grew up with as a Baby Boomer and which changed dramatically for us along the way. That is the balance between having cash and having time. My adult life has mostly been cash rich and time poor compared to my parents and grandparents and the prior generations. Those are the generations that were the heyday of doing it yourself. Nothing was made in China and Made in Japan was synonymous with cheap and nasty. I grew up with the term "Jap Crap" How the world has changed. Back then, if you didn't or couldn't make it you often didn't have it. Lee Loaders, the Lyman 310 Tong Tool, etc are examples of products that allowed cash poor, time rich folk to make the means to put meat on the table. Literally many thousands of them. And for many that was the only way they could get meat. By hunting nd by hunting with roll yer owns. Again, how the world has changed. Lee Loaders pushed out of the way by cling wrap and upsized burgers with fries.

The world tends to work in cycles of a sort. Perhaps our task is not to recruit the unrecruitable but to preserve the knowhow.

I have a bunch of grandkids, all but one are boys and the eldest are now 15. I take them all shooting and hunting. The interest waxes and wanes with the exception of a 9yr old who is besotted and sits at my reloading bench maki g ammo for his dad. A couple of them I suspect will move on to other things and are unlikely to come back to it. But at least its within their horizons. The girl is a hot prospect. The pig in the pen is not a pig to her, its bacon! The feral goat is just another kind of lamb roast! Some of them are too young right now but they will get their chance.

Interestingly a couple of young tradies who did some work for me and who hunt a couple of times a year asked me to load for them. I made the bench available and had them roll their own. Hooked! A mate from Uni days, a few years younger than me, and finallyb retiring, put his hand up for help to buy a couple of new rifles including his first deer rifle, a 7mm08. He has some cast and some jacketed ammo from me to put thru it on his first range visit. And bought his first jugs of powder.

But who knows. A little here, a little there. Bread on the waters. And a forum like this plays a huge part in preserving the knowledge, furthering the sport.

Cheers J.

PS. Dinner tonight was Shepherd's Pie made with slow roast Goat Shoulder cooked in gravy beans, carrots, garlic and onion, meat pulled and returned with layer of frozen peas, corn and garden spinach all topped with a mashed potato crust sprinkled with grated cheese and ground pepper then baked for 30 min. From hill to table, a young nanny, neck shot at 65m with a hand loaded 223 from a Ruger Ranch II. (A cast bullet from my 44-40 next year I hope). Yum!

John - New Zealand

Attached Files

  • Liked by
  • RicinYakima
  • Glaciers
Buttersdad posted this 2 weeks ago

I don't know about all that, but in the midwest here, it's still not hard to convince real shooters to join the addiction. As for CBA, I advise anyone who listens to join the forum. I think if we can get them interested in what they read here from real experts, ( yeah that's you guy's) then hopefully they will at least be curious about what they are missing. I just spoke to a MO conservation officer yesterday at the range. He's 46 and very interested in the outdoors, When I told him I reload his face lit up, and he gave me his card. I'll give it a couple days and text him to introduce myself. Then after that I'll offer to help him get started reloading while suggesting this site for more and much better info.

I know there are many reloaders in my area. When I started I could go to the range almost weekly just to police the spent cases and almost always find a bunch. Then several years ago it got to where I didn't find it as often. Of course now after all the virus stuff and now the economy it's not much better but I still see folks shooting their own handloaded ammo.

I have a few friends who want to get into reloading too and they ask if I will supply them with powder and primers, to which I have to decline since what I have must last me and mine for an unknown time. AS for prices, the one LGS here that carries supplies the cost of powder hasn't really rose much but primers are still almost unobtainium. I have always been one to want to help others, but to use a phrase of my moms I won't cut my nose off to spite my face. I have and do take folks out to shoot who don't own firearms, and offer to help with getting equipment and components for reloading. Once I get them interested I send them here.

 

Attached Files

  • Liked by
  • Ross Smith
Glaciers posted this 6 days ago

Well I don’t know about the defeatist attitude in some posts, but I certainly understand where it comes from.  Ed Harris is right on the money about the powers that be doing everything they can to make it difficult to participate in shooting and reloading.  
But of the last year or two I have sold off a lot of reloading components that when I thought about my life span, I couldn’t use unless I turned this hobby into a job.  The reloading tools and molds I was not using and did not want to use sold for good prices which allowed me to reinvest in new molds from semi custom makers so it was good for me.  But quite a few people buying wanted to get into reloading and some of course were reloaders already.  I didn’t gouge but I didn’t have to give stuff away either.  One very important often overlooked benefit is a fair amount of freed up space which allowed for organization of a smaller reloading space.

I am personally dismayed when I look at gun shows in my travels where almost every table is black guns.  I just like to put my fingerprints on wood and blue steel.  I do enjoy the semi autos, but the change from hitting your target and spray and pray shooters is difficult for a old school guy to understand.  Yes it’s fun, but, then your out of ammo and your target might still be a virgin.

My two nephews like to empty mags in rapid order here on my range, but I’ve got them collecting brass and they are getting interested in bolt guns because they have figured out that a 223 isn’t a big game caliber. So there’s hope, I’m working on them.

But on a good note of a direction for myself is I will be spending time with my Son and 3 grandkids ages 8 to 12 in the lower 48 in winter times.  This will be a winter snowbird project as I will not be anywhere but in Alaska on the homestead in the warmer months.. Home and heaven.  

I will be setting up a reloading bench (bench is already there and unused) and have joined a very nice gun club and range about 10 miles from their house.  I have a couple of bolt action 22’s and a few other youngster/beginner firearms which will be put to use along with proper training and respect for making that bullet count and hitting the target.  I suspect that some in family competition will come of this.  That’s my intention and a small part of guiding youngsters into our sport.  Not being proactive to bring the next generation in, is a mistake.  I know some here already do that, but, some get with drawn because of the uneducated narrative that’s prevalent today.  But, only you can promote the respect our sport deserves.

Trust me, I’m a loner, but this is also an opportunity for me to come out and do something.  I do a lot of reloading, casting, and shooting by myself.  Got to pass on what I know, besides, I’ve got great grandkids.

 

 

 

Attached Files

Aaron posted this 6 days ago

Great comments in this thread. Good reading!

Attached Files

max503 posted this 3 days ago

I've tried to give away a 38 caliber Lee Loader to friends.  Even offered them some powder, primers, and boolits.  No takers.  I have a grandson I hope will take it when he turns 21 soon.  

Attached Files

Lucky1 posted this 2 days ago

Everyone here has a different path on how they get started with cast. A few years ago, I had a couple of friends over to my range for a Sunday afternoon session. One was shooting cast and the other one a newer shoot who reloaded jacketed. He fired a handful of those while we shot about 150 cast rounds for the same money. After a couple of sessions like that, it didn't take long for the newer shooter to realize that we were having more fun for the bucks and shooting pretty well too. So he took the plunge and bought a pot and lead, set up in my shop and borrowed some of my molds to get started. A couple of years later and now he goes to CBA shoots and has learned a lot in the process while adding molds and accouterments to his stash. A few weeks ago a neighbor asked about casting for his 45 Colt so here we go again. Yes, it's one at a time but they are much younger than me so hopefully there is a future and certainly worth my time. Second thought. I'm not retired yet so I feel the time crunch too. It does take dedication to cast, size and lube, reload with extra steps; and even research those loads because sometimes data is limited. I'm sure it takes me several hours to produce a 50 rd box of quality ammo if figured from sitting down at the pot to closing the box lid the final time. Most people consider pulling the trigger the fun part, not reloading per se. I will confess my weird outlook that casting and reloading is therapeutic because I can suppress work and life related stresses by putting them in the background while I do it. Plus I take pride in a job well done when the target looks good and realize it's my handiwork. I'm also old enough to not spend several hours a day on social media so I can head to the reloading bench instead. Yes, there are always obstacles but I prefer to focus on what I can do to overcome them.

Attached Files

  • Liked by
  • Glaciers
Close