Hard cast bullets/and pure

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  • Last Post 08 March 2023
2frogs posted this 07 March 2023

Found 2 box's of 44 cast bullets at a flea market place. What would I have if I mixed lead pipe at say 50/50 ? Would it still be pretty hard. Thanks

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Lee Guthrie posted this 07 March 2023

You'd have something: quantity, quality, weight, and hardness unknown.

What you are asking is, if I had an unknown quantity (or quality) of X, and I blended it with an unknown quantity (or quality) of Y, what would I have?  Your flea market 44s could be pure lead or could be linotype, and your pipe could be pure lead or an alloy of lead and calcium.

If you had a hardness tester you would know exactly how hard they would be.  An LBT tester will be hard to come by, a Saeco can still be had, but graduated hardness lead pencils will give you a reasonable approximation at an affordable price.

  

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Duane Mellenbruch posted this 07 March 2023

At times the commercial caster will mention the hardness of the bullets at the time of sale.  This does not tell the buyer if the bullets are heat treated and quenched or if it is made from a specific alloy.  Roll the dice or have a sample scanned to find out what it really is made from.

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Aaron posted this 07 March 2023

 John,

You would end up with 1/2 unit "lead" pipe of unknown alloy and 1/2 unit of bullets of unknown alloy to give you 1 unit of absolutely unknown alloy. That would be great for scuba weights or lead fishing sinkers.

Blend it all up and cast some bullets with it. See how they do.

Where X=? and Y=? then X+Y=2?

 

With rifle in hand, I confidently go forth into the darkness.

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2frogs posted this 07 March 2023

According to my hightech lee tester,they are 18 bhn? They are from Rimrock..If this means anything..

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skeet1 posted this 07 March 2023

The term "hard Cast" is very subjective. The bullets you have are from an unknown alloy and may or may not be heat treated. If you melt them down the heat treatment goes away and you will end up with what ever the alloy was when it was first cast. The only way to know if the mix of pure lead and your unknown alloy will be a decent bullet metal is to try it.

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Duane Mellenbruch posted this 08 March 2023

 This link will provide you with their catalog so you can compare what you have with what they offer.  If still uncertain, their phone number is on the site. 

https://rimrockbullets.com/xcart/?target=main

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delmarskid posted this 08 March 2023

For myself I would reduce each to ingots and experiment.

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