A question on rifle load

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  • Last Post 28 January 2023
sluggo posted this 27 January 2023

Most of my cast bullet shooting is for handguns. I am on the learning curve for rifles. I am loading some 30-06 rounds for a 1903 A3. With the case neck in the crimp groove the nose of the bullet goes about a 1/4 inch into the rifling. Is this safe? Should I worry about high pressure? I am using data from the lyman cast bullet handbook. The bullet weighs 220 grains and I will be using unique and Hercules 2400 powder. [I know its old powder but it works fine]. Can I use the lyman data as is? Thanks in advance for any help with my new project.

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Bud Hyett posted this 27 January 2023

Good place to start for seating depth. I am assuming the bullet goes down to the bottom of he case neck.

Check the Fouling Shot match reports for these powders and loads. Both 2400 and Unique are commonly used, usually between 1600 and 1700 feet-per-second.   

As long as you work up the loads, you'll be okay.  

Farm boy from Illinois, living in the magical Pacific Northwest

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RicinYakima posted this 27 January 2023

You are in great shape! 16 grains of A2400 with that  bullet has won many matches of the last 20 years. 

Lyman data is created to give you the least amount of problems. Also remember that they don't test for lighter loads, just reduce the top load by 10%.

The question always is, what do you want to do with the load?

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sluggo posted this 27 January 2023

Hello: The base of the bullet is just above the shoulder of the case when loaded. I hope to use these rounds for target shooting. Thank you for your insight. There are a few more variables here than my usual straight walled pistol loads!

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gnoahhh posted this 27 January 2023

It looks like you're on the right track. It's a bore riding bullet and you want to see the lands engraving on it ever so slightly. Were it me, I would plan on seating the bullet a lot farther out to shorten the distance the top driving band of the bullet has to jump before engaging the rifling.

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John Carlson posted this 28 January 2023

As above.  Ideally I like to have the front driving band right at the rifling.  This of course requires that the bore riding section of the bullet is sized properly (as yours appears to be) and the driving bands are sized to match the throat.

John Carlson. CBA Director of Military Competition.

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