Separating Range Bullets from dirt

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  • Last Post 18 September 2011
afish4570 posted this 12 September 2011

Used a large SS colander I bought at a garage sale for $2.00 , a three prong garden weeding tool lots of shaking.afish4570:dude:

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JeffinNZ posted this 12 September 2011

I am lucky. Our range catches bullets in ground up rubber. Clean material.

Cheers from New Zealand

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CB posted this 12 September 2011

what about the water runoff with minute traces of lead, Where does that go?

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LWesthoff posted this 13 September 2011

Probably back in the ground. I'm pretty sure that's where the lead came from to begin with.

Wes

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CB posted this 13 September 2011

Around here the powers that be would barbeque you if they caught you allowing potentially lead tainted runoff into the sewers, or even in your grass. There would be a big, expensive cleanup, at your expense. Lead does not naturally occur everywhere.

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Black and Blue posted this 13 September 2011

Reckon none of the cars in Lincoln drip oil, loose a wheel weigth, give off brake dust and diesels don't smoke. How do they handle the smell from the feed lots and silage pits.:vio:

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cityboy posted this 13 September 2011

Lead does NOT leach into the soil. A range I shot on was tested by folks looking for trouble and they found nothing.

I also recall reading a report of a test for a large range in Virginia; nothing was found. I think it was also cited in the Riflemaan.

Jim

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CB posted this 14 September 2011

You want to try using reason on politicians? We had a lead plant in Omaha (Asarco). The cleanup ran several millions. I really don't care what you do, just be careful not to get caught. Imagine the headlines, even if bogus.

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72coupe posted this 14 September 2011

I have only done range pickups once so I am no expert on the subject but what I did was I just threw it all into the smelting  pot. Everything that is not lead will float and can be skimmed off.

I picked up about 400 pounds of dirt and bullets that yeilded 250 pounds of lead alloy. I wasn't selective I just scooped it up with a shovel.

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TRKakaCatWhisperer posted this 14 September 2011

anachronism wrote: what about the water runoff with minute traces of lead, Where does that go?

Good question.  The water was tested (from runoff at the nearby public range when they removed TONS of lead - nothing to worry about).

Lead in the metalic form will oxidize at the surface and very little else runs off.

Lead in combination with other things (as old paint) is quite another issue.

 

 

 

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shastaboat posted this 15 September 2011

Also make sure the washed lead is completely dry before attempting to put into your casting pot. I blew up a pot of lead one time and was lucky!

Because I said so!

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nicholst55 posted this 18 September 2011

TRK wrote: anachronism wrote: what about the water runoff with minute traces of lead, Where does that go?

Good question.  The water was tested (from runoff at the nearby public range when they removed TONS of lead - nothing to worry about).

Lead in the metalic form will oxidize at the surface and very little else runs off.

Lead in combination with other things (as old paint) is quite another issue.

IIRC, Lake Erie, in the vicinity of Camp Perry, has been tested for lead content more than once at the insistence of the congresscritters who want to shut it down. Lead levels were just very slightly higher than average, and well within acceptable limits. They figured it would be a slam-dunk, since the National Matches have been held there for 100 years!

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